Preview of a New Book By Ben Greenfield “How To Get Fat”! (Leave Your Comments Please…)

Affiliate Disclosure

Articles, Nutrition

Next year, in an effort to help people learn from the nutrition, exercise and lifestyle mistakes of others, I'll be releasing a new book called “How To Get Fat”, in which I will tell you exactly how to get fat. Here's a preview. Please leave a comment and let me know what you think (after all, you don't want me to write a book with material that you won't read!)

How To Get Fat

An Excerpt from the Chapter “Fat People Diet”:

Here is a recent food and drink log from Brian, a client of mine who not only suffers from obesity, but also constant joint pains and aches, insomnia, mood swings, and chronic fatigue:

8am: Ensure (bottled nutrition smoothie)

10am: Apple with diet energy drink

noon: Tuna sandwich with fat-free apple chips

2pm: Diet Coke

4pm: Powerbar protein bar

6pm: Nutrisystem “hearty beef stew”

7pm: Diet Coke

In employing my services as a nutrition counselor, Brian had one burning question: “How can I still be fat when I am on such a strict diet?”

Indeed, how can it be that a human body can consume bottled drinks and packaged foods that have been specifically designed to eliminate calories and support complete nutrition, and yet that same human body can simultaneously experience bloating, fatigue, rapid weight gain and a host of serious health issues?

Let’s begin by inspecting the actual ingredients of Brian’s “diet” foods.

The front label of the Ensure nutrition smoothie says ‘Complete, balanced nutrition to help stay healthy, active and energetic.', with a large upper label that claims, ‘No. 1 Doctor-recommended.'

When you turn to the back of the bottle and inspect the ingredients label, you will find that the top four ingredients are: 1) water; 2) sugar; 3) corn syrup; 4) maltodextrin. Ignoring the fact that Brian is paying an incredibly high price for a product with a primary ingredient of “water”, let’s consider the other components of this nutrition smoothie: sugar.

Sugar is also known as sucrose, which is a processed and refined carbohydrate that has been linked in clinical studies to diabetes, depression, weight gain, obesity and various nutritional deficiencies. As if that weren’t enough, sugar is also a highly acidic compound that forces your body to balance the acid load by harvesting calcium, a non-acidic compound, from your bones. And therefore, you can add osteoporosis and low bone strength to the list of symptoms aggravated by the nutrition smoothie.

Perhaps the most serious threat that sugar poses to an overweight or obese individual is it’s hormonal effect on the pancreas and the liver. A high or consistent consumption of sugar can cause decreased insulin sensitivity, which is a precursor to adult onset diabetes and a frustrating inability to metabolize carbohydrates properly. These unused carbohydrates are eventually shuttled to the liver, where they are converted into fat, and marched to the waistline, hips, butt, and anywhere else you tend to store fat.

Perhaps at this point, you are wondering how Ensure came to “No. 1 Doctor-recommended!”. But then again, in the not too recent past, physicians used to promote cigarettes.

The third listed ingredient in Ensure is corn syrup. As you may already know, high fructose corn syrup is the primary sweetener in soft drinks, which is why dozens of studies have linked soda consumption to obesity. Like sucrose, corn syrup is a processed, refined carbohydrate that can decrease insulin sensitivity and can easily be converted into fat by the human body. And like sucrose, corn syrup is completely void of vitamins, minerals and Ensure’s primary advertised feature: “Nutrition”.

Maltodextrin is the fourth ingredient. Perhaps by now you may have guessed, but maltodextrin is also a processed and refined carbohydate. As a matter of fact, maltodextrin is utilized as an incredibly sweet and highly dense energy source by competitive cyclists, marathoners, and triathletes, who are burning 800-1000 calories per hour. Ironically, in this instance, maltodextrin is featured a supplement designed to reduce caloric intake.

The list of ingredients following maltodextrin are popular compounds that we find in many packaged nutrition drinks, including:

“Milk Protein Concentrate, Canola Oil, Soy Protein Concentrate, Corn Oil, Short-Chain Fructooligosaccharides, Whey Protein Concentrate, Magnesium Phosphate, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Potassium Citrate, Sodium Citrate, Soy Lecithin, Calcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Salt (Sodium Chloride), Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Carrageenan, Ferrous Sulfate, dl-Alpha-Tocopheryl Acetate, Zinc Sulfate, Niacinamide, Manganese Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Cupric Sulfate, Vitamin A Palmitate, Thiamine Chloride Hydrochloride, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Chromium Chloride, Biotin, Sodium Molybdate, Sodium Selenate, Potassium Iodide, Phylloquinone, Vitamin D3, and Cyanocobalamin.”

For anyone with food allergies or insensitivities that can cause bloating, fat fluctuations and other health issues discussed in Chapter 13, the presence of soy, whey, dairy and several other compounds in this ingredient laundry list can spell serious weight gain.

Interestingly, Ensure is owned by pharmaceutical giant Abbott Laboratories. You will learn more about the effect of “modern medicine” on the obesity epidemic in Chapter 24.

In sum, Brian’s expensive morning nutrition smoothie could be described as “sugar-water with added vitamins”, and he could achieve a similar effect by drinking a cheap can of soda and taking a generic multi-vitamin. So much for ‘complete, balanced nutrition’.

A couple hours after his Ensure breakfast, Brian then moves on to his mid-morning diet energy drink, which many popular energy drink manufacturers claim as “fat burners”, “thermogenics” and “dietary aids”. As a nutrition consultant, for the sake of my clients who are attempting to lose weight I have sometimes wished in the past that energy drinks did not exist. There are two reasons why.

First, there is a distinct danger of caffeine overdose and addiction. The average energy drink contains nearly 4 times the amount of caffeine found in commercial soda beverages and several of the more popular brands contain the caffeine equivalent of 14 Cokes. A 6-ounce cup of coffee has 80-150 milligrams (mg) of caffeine, but the caffeine content of energy drinks ranges from 50-500+ mg, with one popular energy drink “shot” topping out at 570mg, which gives you the equivalent of about three and a half cups of coffee with a single sip!

Why should this concern you? Because caffeine forces your adrenal glands to secrete enormous amounts of adrenaline and “energy” hormones, even when those glands are depleted. The result is a growing tolerance to the effects of caffeine, and eventual burn-out and severe adrenal depletion. This is accompanied by a feeling of increasing tiredness and a need for higher and higher amounts of caffeine to achieve an energy boost. Attempts at quitting the addiction can result in withdrawal symptoms such as severe headaches and complete loss of mental focus and function.

In addition, by inhibiting the activity of the vitamin folate, B12 and B6, high levels of caffeine may interfere with your body's ability to regulate two significant cardiovascular disease risk factors: homocysteine and cholesterol. By causing blood vessel constriction and increased risk of blood clots, the caffeine content in some energy drinks can literally be deadly for someone with high stress levels or high blood pressure. Finally, high levels of caffeine consumption have been associated with increased risk of stroke and arthritis, insomnia, heart palpitations, tremors, sweating, nausea, diarrhea, chest pain, and neurological symptoms!

If overweight or obesity is your concern, the most dangerous of these responses is the adrenal depletion, which can cause an eventual slowing of the metabolism and “stagnation” of weight loss.

The second reason to avoid energy drinks is due to the high sugar or artificial sweetener intake. One can of energy drink contains the equivalent of nearly 10 teaspoons of sugar! As you have already learned, this enormous amount of sugar causes your sensitive pancreas to create a literal flood of insulin in an attempt to manage all the extra glucose that ends up in the bloodstream. Some of this sugar may be used by the muscles, but usually only if you are exercising quite frequently. The remainder of the sugar is converted into fat by the liver. In addition, as a response to the surge in insulin, the body releases both epinephrine and cortisol from your adrenal glands (as if they weren't already stressed enough from the caffeine!). The result is  quick swing in energy, followed by a subsequent crash, a severely compromised immune system, a surge of cell-damaging “free radicals”, thickened blood, weight gain and an eventual insensitivity to insulin, also know as type II diabetes.

But what about artificial sweeteners, such as those found in Brian’s ‘diet’ version of the energy drink? Don't they eliminate this problem? Unfortunately, research has shown that there is still a release of gastric hormones when you consume an artificial sweetener. This gives your brain a confusing message: that food is present, but that the food has no “calories”. Subsequently, you develop an appetite craving typically 30-60 minutes after consuming an artificially sweetened beverage.

In addition, these artificially sweetened chemicals (yes, chemicals!) such as aspartame (Nutrasweet), sucralose (Splenda), acesulfame potassium, and sugar alcohols have been linked to upset stomachs, mood swings, birth defects, cancer, diabetes, emotional disorders, epilepsy, seizures, a variety of neurological disorders and even obesity!

Even if Brian has had two strikes against weight loss with his breakfast and mid-morning snacks, surely his lunch, comprised of a tuna sandwich with fat-free apple chips cannot be a problem? Ignoring the tuna sandwich, which, if prepared with fat-free yogurt rather than mayonnaise, may actually be conducive to weight loss, let’s focus on the fat-free apple chips.

Your weight loss radar should always be alerted when you see the terms ‘low-fat’ or ‘fat-free’. Upon further inspection of the ingredients label, you will usually find that fat has been eliminated in favor of sugars, which the human body is very efficient at converting into…fat.

In the case of fat-free apple chips, the fat has not been eliminated, but instead added! Here are the ingredients:

“Apples, canola and/or sunflower oil, corn syrup, citric acid, ascorbic acid (vitamin C).”

In other words, to make the dehydrated apples actually palatable, the manufacturer has added vegetable oils (the dangers of which you will learn about in Chapter 17) and corn syrup! Although this snack may still not pack as many calories as a bag of potato chips, it is still a far inferior alternative to a piece of fresh, raw fruit.

At 2pm, and later, with dinner, Brian consumes a diet Coke. Just like the diet energy drink, this is a beverage that contains a no-calorie artificial sweetener that may be ruining Brian’s ability to control food intake and body weight. As a matter of fact, a recent study from Purdue University found that compared with rats that ate yogurt sweetened with regular sugar, rats that ate yogurt sweetened with an artificial sweetener (saccharin), consumed more calories, gained more weight, and put on more body fat! In addition, the rats that consumed the artificially sweetened yogurt had a lower post-meal rise in their body temperature and metabolism, making it harder for them to burn more calories.

Other research has shown that diet sodas may double the risk of obesity, stimulate the appetite, stimulate carbohydrate cravings, stimulate fat storage, stimulate weight gain and cause “roller-coaster” eating habits.

But the health hazards of diet sodas go far beyond an inability to lose fat.

For example, asparatame contains a substance called “phenylalanine”, which can easily disrupt your brain’s very sensitive serotonin and dopamine balance, leading to migraine headaches. In addition, the aspartic acid in aspartame is known as an excitotoxin, which can disrupt fragile fibers in your brain and cause specific brain cells to become excessively excited, to the point they will quickly die. Finally, when consumed by the human body, certain parts of aspartame are broken down to formaldehyde and methanol, which can be toxic in consistently consumed quantities.

Brian finishes his day with two final meals: a Powerbar Protein bar and a Nutrisystem hearty stew meal.

The first few ingredients of the Powerbar Protein bar read similarly to the Ensure smoothie:

“PowerBar Protein Blend (Whey protein, Casein, Soy Protein), Brown Rice Syrup, Sugar, Fractionated Palm Kernel Oil, Coca Powder, Maltitol, High Fructusoe Corn Syrup, Glycerine, Alkalized Cocoa Powder.”

By now, you realize that although Brian could have easily purchased this bar at the front desk of a health club, these none of these ingredients are encouraging his body to lose fat, and are probably instead causing weight gain.

At first glance, the Nutrisystem meal appears to be one of the more “natural” meals that Brian has consumed the entire day. The ingredient label reads:

“Water, Beef, Potatoes, Carrots, Tomatoes, Peas, Soy Protein, Celery, Corn Flour, Hydrolyzed Corn, Wheat Protein, Salt, Potassium Chloride, Autolyzed Yeast, Sugar, Caramel Color, Tartaric Acid.”

Despite a couple red flags such as hydrolyzed corn and sugar, this label appears rather innocent compared to other foods that Brian has consumed earlier in the day. The actual nutrition fact label of the Nutrisystem meal, however, reveals nearly 500mg of sodium, or 20% of Brian’s daily recommended value.

Why is this a problem? Not only is excess sodium intake one of the single highest causes of high blood pressure, but the incredibly high amounts of salt in processed and packaged foods like Nutrisystem, powdered and canned soups, frozen meals, and deli casseroles and salads can cause bloating, water retention, swollen extremities, fatigue and lethargy, complaints often voiced by overweight and obese individuals.

Hence the title of this chapter, “Fat People Diet”. By falling prey to the advertisements, hype and marketing behind fat-free products, weight loss foods, pre-packaged meals, and convenient healthy nutrition smoothies, Brian is filling his body with dangerous compounds that are completely contradictory to weight loss, and placing himself at risk for even more serious problems in the future.

So how could Brian “ditch his diet”?

Step 1: In the morning, eat something real. That’s right: choose a food that grew on a tree or from the ground, and is immediately recognizable. Try some oats. All you need is hot water. Add a handful of almonds, a splash of milk, and a teaspoon of honey. Take advantage of the fact that when you wake up and light hits your eyes, your body’s metabolism naturally “revs up”, and carbohydrates are OK in the morning.

Step 2: Don’t wait until lunch to eat. Your body will be more likely to have a blood sugar and insulin spike after a 4-5 hour break from eating, and you’ll probably eat more than you should for lunch. Instead, in the mid-morning, have a fresh piece of raw fruit, like a grapefruit. Save the proteins and the fats for later in the afternoon, when your metabolism begins to slow.

Step 3: Just like breakfast, eat real food for lunch. Try the “salad in a jar” approach. Using a large canning jar or Tupperware container, first put 1 tablespoon olive oil + one tablespoon balsamic vinaigrette. Then add 4-6oz of chicken, turkey, beef  or lamb. Then add ½ sliced red or green pepper, ¼ sliced red onion, handful olives, mushrooms, ½ sliced cucumber and ½ sliced tomato. Finally, add a handful of mixed greens. After emptying the jar, everything will pile up on the plate perfectly! This is a convenient lunch to take to work.

Step 4: Have a mid-afternoon snack, comprised of easily recognizable, non-processed proteins and/or fats. Try splitting half an avocado, sprinkled a bit of cheddar cheese in the center, and microwaving for 30 seconds.

Step 5: Have some soup for dinner. But rather than opting for a pre-packaged powder or processed, prepared version full of sodium and MSG, try a super-fast and incredibly healthy version of miso soup. Into 2 cups of water, add 1 tablespoon miso, 1/2 red onion, 1 handful spinach, 1 cup chopped mushrooms, 1 tablespoon almond butter or tahini, and 1/2 clove garlic. Bring ingredients to a bowl and simmer for 10 minutes.

As you can see, it is completely possible to ditch the diet and still eat healthy! Just remember, healthy fat-loss nutrition is a lifestyle, not a set of rules or specially prepared boxes, cans and bottles of magic fat-loss foods.

So what do YOU think about this sample chapter excerpt? There are thirty additional chapters in this book, each one inspecting the specific lifestyle, exercise and nutrition habits that lead to fat formation. Is this a book YOU would read? Leave a comment below!

Ask Ben a Podcast Question




18 thoughts on “Preview of a New Book By Ben Greenfield “How To Get Fat”! (Leave Your Comments Please…)

  1. Anonymous says:

    Sugar is not acidic – you lose all credibility (and readers) as soon as you put rubbish like that down.

    1. It's not acidic. But it can lead to acidity in vivo.

  2. Vicki says:

    Great breakdown of “nutrition” & lack of! I really like the examples of change to the eating plan. I’ve made the “Miso Soup” 2x now & I LOVE IT! Perfect especially for this time of year.

  3. Buddy Monk says:

    Right on! I was gripped from the beginning! I would definitely read more.

  4. Here are some other comments received via e-mail:

    “The more I listen to your podcasts & read your info the more I like you!!! In my opinion, there are few “nutrition & exercise experts” out there that are actually on the right track. Thankfully, I think you are one of the few that is disseminating accurate information. It is difficult to get the right information out when you are competing with large food, agri, farma & medical companies with massive advertising budgets. I appreciate your hard work and know that it is greatly needed. I look forward every week to your podcasts & all that I will learn from them. As a future trainer, I will be using your expertise as a resource.

    The most important service I feel you provide is the ability to sift through all the info & research and communicate it to your clients and public in a non-threatening, understandable way so that they can actually digest it and use it. The excerpt from your book indicates to me that it will be a great resource for many.

    I posted your link to the book on my Facebook page and got comments stating that this kind of information is really needed, especially in the States. The obesity problem is just so evident but I think average Americans watch so much TV that they are brainwashed by the false advertising and become confused as to what to do. They just assume that if a label says it’s “natural” or low-fat, they should be eating it. I love the way you dissect this and debunk this in your sample chapter.

    As far as actual content, I would love to see more info & research about high fructose corn syrup included in your book. You might already have that topic included, as you could write an entire chapter about it. Just the fact that it can turn off the “full signal” going to your brain is important for obese clients. Corn sugars are just so pervasive!!! I just feel if we could get people to cut back on it, then eliminate it, we’d make a huge dent in our health problems. It’s like cigarette smoking used to be….we just need to keep talking and writing about it until people become aware of its dangers (scared!) I talk about it so much that just the other day, my son, who is learning to read, read a label and said, “ewww this has corn sugar in it…that’s bad”. Look at what the breast cancer folks have achieved…and breast cancer is not the biggest killer of women. I’d love to run a marathon to raise money for research & awareness for the dangers of corn syrup! Then we have to target the big corn agribusinesses/lobbyist, but that’s another topic!

    The editor in me found this typo: By now, you realize that although Brian could have easily purchased this bar at the front desk of a health club, these none of these ingredients are encouraging his body to lose fat, and are probably instead causing weight gain.

    I’m looking forward to the release of the entire book and will definitely be sharing it far and wide!
    Thanks for everything!”

    The more I listen to your podcasts & read your info the more I like you!!! In my opinion, there are few “nutrition & exercise experts” out there that are actually on the right track. Thankfully, I think you are one of the few that is disseminating accurate information. It is difficult to get the right information out when you are competing with large food, agri, farma & medical companies with massive advertising budgets. I appreciate your hard work and know that it is greatly needed. I look forward every week to your podcasts & all that I will learn from them. As a future trainer, I will be using your expertise as a resource.

    The most important service I feel you provide is the ability to sift through all the info & research and communicate it to your clients and public in a non-threatening, understandable way so that they can actually digest it and use it. The excerpt from your book indicates to me that it will be a great resource for many.

    I posted your link to the book on my Facebook page and got comments stating that this kind of information is really needed, especially in the States. The obesity problem is just so evident but I think average Americans watch so much TV that they are brainwashed by the false advertising and become confused as to what to do. They just assume that if a label says it’s “natural” or low-fat, they should be eating it. I love the way you dissect this and debunk this in your sample chapter.

    As far as actual content, I would love to see more info & research about high fructose corn syrup included in your book. You might already have that topic included, as you could write an entire chapter about it. Just the fact that it can turn off the “full signal” going to your brain is important for obese clients. Corn sugars are just so pervasive!!! I just feel if we could get people to cut back on it, then eliminate it, we’d make a huge dent in our health problems. It’s like cigarette smoking used to be….we just need to keep talking and writing about it until people become aware of its dangers (scared!) I talk about it so much that just the other day, my son, who is learning to read, read a label and said, “ewww this has corn sugar in it…that’s bad”. Look at what the breast cancer folks have achieved…and breast cancer is not the biggest killer of women. I’d love to run a marathon to raise money for research & awareness for the dangers of corn syrup! Then we have to target the big corn agribusinesses/lobbyist, but that’s another topic!

    The editor in me found this typo: By now, you realize that although Brian could have easily purchased this bar at the front desk of a health club, these none of these ingredients are encouraging his body to lose fat, and are probably instead causing weight gain.

    I’m looking forward to the release of the entire book and will definitely be sharing it far and wide!
    Thanks for everything!

    Ben,
      I would totally read this book. I think my entire problem with fatigue and weight gain is that I don’t know what to eat. Everyday I am surrounded with a million ads telling me why this or that is good for me. I’m not a nutrition major–I will graduate with a degree in Public Relations for heavens sake. I grew up in a home with a mother and father who HATE cooking and so take-out was the name of the game. Now I’m 24, have struggling with body image issues and my body weight has been up and down more times than you can count.
     
    I would love to read the rest of this book because its real and gets down to the basics of healthy nutrition. I love that you are not trying to sell me ANYTHING.
     
    thanks for all you do
     
    heidi

    Hi Ben…this is GREAT!! I am fascinated by all of this – and have been
    “into” eating healthy and understanding nutrition for most of my life….
    Once I become certified, I hope to be able to take you up on your offer to
    work with you at Pilgrims – it would be a great experience!

    When I was reading the below – it made me recall a few chapters in a book
    called “the Omnivore’s Dilemma” (by Michael Pollan). Have you read it? It
    was a ‘eye opener’ for me…sort of one of many “ah ha!” moments….

    Have a good evening!

    Eric

    Hi Ben, I did not even read all of the article you just sent( I will later) but just have to say this..I think the biggest problem is people just don’t cook for themselves. We have been told over and over from the media and all our co-workers we are just too busy “now-a-days”to cook. People don’t know how to cook, if they did, we would not have such a problem. WE have to get them to cook!!! 
     
    cindy

    Ben –

    Thank you for the peek at your new book. Very, very interesting information. I would recommend the book to several people I know who insist on buying non-fat or diet everything in the hopes of dropping weight. I think this would be a real eye opener for lots of folks.

    Bridget

  5. Jason says:

    The book sounds like a great read. I have been somewhat tirelessly trying to influence both my parents nutrition for the better, including giving up soda, but they just do not want to give in. I plan on printing this excerpt tonight and reading it aloud to them at the dinner table.

    Hopefully this will be a great tool to get them to want to make the change for themselves.

  6. kathy says:

    Hey Ben,
    Excellent excerpt! I am printing it off and reading it
    aloud to my clients! I always new Ensure was crap, but when clients have had their doctors recommend it, it can be difficult to
    persuade them not to drink it…. I would MAKE all of my clients buy the book! Press on!!

  7. jilani says:

    I liked the ideas for meals to replace the crappy diet in the real example (which I really liked as well). That said, the recommended diet would get boring in about, oh, a week. Perhaps a chapter or two just with breakfast/lunch/dinner/snacks ideas would be immensely valuable (not just interpersed in the book)….

  8. Diane Swift says:

    I for sure would read this book. Very interested
    in actual diets people eat.Very interesting when
    you break it down.
    I also have bloating, insomnia,joint pain,fatigue and keep losing the same 7lbs over and over.
    Thumbs up to this book!

  9. Todd says:

    Hey Ben, I really like this take on fat-loss, by showing that the traditional “diet” products we think will help us lose weight and fat actually contribute to the opposite effect. My only concern would be to ensure the that the ‘tongue in cheeks’ portions are exactly that – no confusion whatsoever. Secondly, your suggestions in the steps are great, but the one area that convenience foods triumph is that they are convenient. The real foods you suggest, and that I have found (i.e. miso) are great once you find them. However, some can be a challenge, or signifcantly more expensive. I would add a chapter or section talking about “Real food shopping tips” – where to buy some of the best real foods. Now that these foods are all in my pantry, they are easy to reach for and consume. Keep up the writing, Ben!

  10. Scott says:

    What I liked about this excerpt is how Ben broke down each meal and thoroughly examined the ingredients, using scientific research to explain the impact on a person’s body. Ben spends several paragraphs making a sound argument and explaining how excess sugar can directly contribute to body fat. It was eye opening to read some of the research on excess caffiene and artifical sweeteners/chemicals, the potential damage they can create on our systems. I look forward to reading the rest of the book!

  11. Katie says:

    I think it’s a great chapter – very eye-opening and explained well. I had never realized the damage I did to myself by consuming large amounts of sugar until I was diagnosed with insulin resistance and subsequently have done A LOT of research. I wish more people had this kind of information BEFORE they do major damage to their health. Look forward to the rest of the book!

  12. Mary Newman says:

    Great information! We need to know what we are putting into our bodies that we call “nutrition”. Thank you!

  13. Emily says:

    Ok, so I am way new at this nutrition stuff… I read what Brian has to eat and I’m like “sound good to me, I see nothing wrong except the diet cokes and energy drinks” Holy crap have I got a lot to learn! I think this would be an excellent book. I am sure like me, many American’s regularly eat a ‘diet’ such as Brian’s and wander, “why am I still fat” We are bombarded with Dr recommended, #1, ‘healthy’ labels. Because we saw it in a magazine or on a popular talk show we automatically assume its good for us. There is so much to learn about nutrition and healthy living but I think in this format it will further expose the hidden grossness in popular ‘healthy’ products and lead those of us oblivious of the fake sugars, caffeine, sodium etc. to learn what we need to eat to stop running down the road to morbid obesity!

  14. Paul says:

    Really intersting info. Just makes you realize that you really have to think and read all the labels of the food you eat.

  15. Bob says:

    I would read the book for some good ideas but I also realize you need to know what you are putting in your body.

  16. Pat says:

    I especially appreciate the real life example of someone who is obese and what he is eating to try to lose weight. This all makes so much sense when you explain it simply, as you have done. I found myself thinking what I’ll be eating tomorrow – and what I won’t be eating tomorrow. But not in a negative way, in a hopeful, upbeat and looking-forward-to-it way! Can’t wait to read the rest of this book.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *