Episode #145: Hallelujah Acres – What Happens When You Mix Vegetarianism, Religion & Fat Loss?

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Fat Loss, Podcast

Click here for the full written transcript of this podcast episode.

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In this May 11, 2011 free audio episode: Hallelujah Acres, should you not eat fruit with a meal, what causes abnormally high heart rate during exercise, how to do a weekly fast and still train hard, are steroidal inhalers safe for exercise, what shoes are best for gym workouts, spectracell testing, cortisol testing.

Remember, if you have any trouble listening, downloading, or transferring to your mp3 player just e-mail [email protected]. And don't forget to leave the podcast a ranking in iTunes – it only takes 2 minutes of your time and helps grow our healthy community! Just click here to go to our iTunes page and leave feedback.

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Featured Topic: “Hallelujah Acres – What Happens When You Mix a Vegetarianism, Religion & Fat Loss?”

In this podcast, I interview George Malkmus from Hallelujah Acres. The Hallelujah Diet, which was designed by George, is a Scripture-based menu of 85% raw, uncooked, and unprocessed plant-based food, and 15% cooked, plant-based food. Hallelujah Acres also has Lifestyle Centers, Villages, and other ways for people who are interested in incorporating Bible-based principles for health and fat loss.

During our discussion, George answers the following questions:

What is Hallelujah Acres?

What kind of people attend?

Do you adhere to a certain diet or nutrition philosophy?

What type of exercise program do attendees do?

How do you feel spirituality affects weight loss and fitness?

During our interview, George mentions the FIT10 Fitness Trainer, which you can view by clicking here.

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Listener Q&A:

====================================== [contact-form 3 “AskBen”] ======================================

Andrei asks: I heard from different sources that you should not eat fruits with or immediately after a meal (instead, wait for at least 2 hours). Is it true and if it is, why? Thanks!

Kalley asks: My question is about my heart rate, specifically when working out. I am 24, a very healthy weight, and active. I've been working out with a trainer for 8 months. I do a lot of strength training, and a decent amount of cardio (varying comfortable jogs and interval training) – but I feel like I have an abnormally high heart rate. When I do intervals, my heart rate will jump to over 200. When I am jogging at a comfortable pace (one I could easily hold a conversation during) my heart rate is around 170 – 180. I'm baffled. Everything I've read suggests that is too high – but I'm an active, healthy 24 year old. Is it possible that my heart rate is higher than normal? I know the standard equation (226 minus your age) isn't necessarily accurate, but a lot of resources lead me to believe I am either horribly out of shape, or have a heart problem.

In my response to Kalley, I talk about how to self-test your heart rate zones. Click here to read more.

Craig asks: I water fast one day per week for religious reasons. I would love to here your thoughts on how to make this work while training for endurance events.

Issa asks: What is advisable to use Spiropent? Does it have any side effects?

Jeff has a call-in question about shoe recommendations for gym based workouts, including Vibram Five Fingers.

Nick asks: You have mentioned Bioletics on the podcast before however I can not recall you ever talking about Spectracell (they offer a simlar testing service), and was wondering if you had heard of them / what your opinion on them is, specifically the Micronutrient test. On face value it would seem more comprehensive / better value for money then Bioletics $249 test.

In my response to Nick, I recommend this test from Bioletics: The Injury and Recovery Profile.

Susan asks: I'm intrigued by the biolectics testing. When I last had blood work done, I had asked for a cortisol test. It consisted of 1 blood draw in the morning. While I don't know the actual results, I was told they were normal. I am concerned about all the stress I place on my body through intense and prolonged exercise. With the sudden weight gain I've experienced (yes, I guess I am in menopause – previous podcast #142)I'm just grasping at straws, trying to figure if there's ANYTHING I can do. Can the saliva test tell me anything more that the blood draw didn't? Thanks again

In my response to Susan, I mention: http://www.diagnostechs.com/TestPanels/AdrenalStressIndex.aspx. You can also get this test through Bioletics, and be sure to let them know I sent you.

Mike has a call in comment on the Bulletproof Knee program.

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Remember, if you have any trouble listening, downloading, or transferring to your mp3 player just e-mail [email protected] And don't forget to leave the podcast a ranking in iTunes – it only takes 2 minutes of your time and helps grow our healthy community! Just click here to go to our iTunes page and leave feedback.

Brand new – get insider VIP tips and discounts from Ben – conveniently delivered directly to your phone! Just complete the information below…

First Name
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Cell # (1+area code):

Scroll down to donate anything over $15 to the show, and Ben will send you a BenGreenfieldFitness.com t-shirt…you can also conveniently donate any amount with your phone by simply clicking here.

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Ask Ben a Podcast Question


9 thoughts on “Episode #145: Hallelujah Acres – What Happens When You Mix Vegetarianism, Religion & Fat Loss?

  1. Tim says:

    Hey Ben, listened to this episode a while back, and i've finally finished a blog post on the topic if you or your listeners would care to have a look: http://realmeneatlettuce.blogspot.com/.

    Keep up the great work
    Tim

  2. Greg Hutson says:

    I think I definitely enjoy guests who make a more science-based argument for their dietary or exercise practices. If I were to engage him in arguing his point though, I would point out that Genesis 1:9 was before the fall of man. In Leviticus and Deuteronomy, the Lord instructs which animals should be eaten and the proper way to prepare them. I am not Jewish myself, but why the argument for eating mostly raw and not following kashrut law?

  3. David says:

    i enjoyed the interview a great deal but i have 1 question. George recemmends that we drink fruit and vegetable juices and throw away the pulp cos thats just useless fibre. But if we throw out the pulp/fibre and just drink the juices, won't that cause our blood sugar to spike up, espeically if there’s lots of fruits in the juice? i figured that the pulp/fibre would serve to slow down the spike in blood sugar levels. any thoughts on this ? thanks….

    1. Yes, which is why I don't recommend juicing or using juiced compounds unless you've just finished a workout or are starting one. Listen the early part of the Q&A on podcas # 146 for more on that…

  4. Aldo Marchetti says:

    George says God gave Adam and Eve everything they needed to eat healthy, but he also said we can't get all the nutrients by simply chewing. So did God give Adam and Eve a juicer and electricity too?

  5. hksparky says:

    Amen! I found it fascinating how he's merged (and justified) his religion beliefs with great diet/exercise habits (as well as what must be great profits for his family!) Good for him! Although listening to him, I'm wondering if he's gone a bit too deep into the religious side and missed some key science. Nonetheless, sounds like he's got thousands doing the right thing. Halellujah! Thanks for bringing him on, really enjoyed it.

  6. hksparky says:

    Ben, you let Mr. Malkmus off the hook pretty easily regarding his comment about amino acids,proteins and carbs. All you said was "interesting"! What's your thoughts?

    1. LOL, we wanna open that can of worms, huh? You know, often I disagree with folks on the podcast, but I'm hesitant to turn it into a "debate" style format vs. simply reporting on a particular health, diet or fitness technique.

      That being said, I personally do not feel that Scriptures condone a vegetarian diet. In a perfect world, vegetarianism would rock. We'd be eating high quality, mineral packed, non-GMO fruits, vegetables, tubers, seeds, nuts, etc. But if you go with Bible-based history, a lot has happened since man and woman originally ate only from the Garden Of Eden.

      I know I'm venturing into religion here, which is always controversial – but things changed in the world with the introduction of sin. The environment changed. Our bodies changed. And from that point on in the Scriptures, God frequently refers to eating meat, heating food, putting fire on food, etc. So I think to a certain extent that higher protein, higher fat diets *in the absence of nutrition supplementation* are better for the human body.

      But George was pretty smart about things. Many vegetarian plans are bad for the brain and the body. But he's introduced things like B12, etc. into the diet, which is great.

      I'm not Paleo, I'm not Atkins, I'm not vegan, I'm not vegetarian, I'm not low-carb, etc. I've tried all those diets, and they're fine. But ultimately, I eat real food that I can get my hands on, supplement discriminately, and maintain a pretty open mind about the rest. Which is why I'll probably never create a "best selling diet book". Because I think diets are mostly hype.

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