Inner Circle Podcast #1 – Are Microwaves Healthy?, Fat Loss Workout Research.

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Fat Loss, Podcast

The brand new Inner Circle Podcast from Ben and Jessa Greenfield will bring you highly practical fat loss, home-cooking, lifestyle and health advice each week! In this week's episode – are microwaves healthy?, fat loss workout research. If you have questions about any topics or workouts covered in the podcast, PLEASE DON'T E-MAIL THEM. Instead, simply leave your comments below.

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Inner Circle Nutrition:

Alternative to microwave ovens: We recommend any of these convection ovens.

Bonus Recipe: Ben's no-microwave morning Power Oatmeal that he eats almost every morning –

Put 1 cup of water and 1/2 cup of oatmeal in pot on stove. As oatmeal simmers, stir in 1/2 chopped, ripe banana, 2 scoops protein powder, 1 tablespoon almond butter, 2 tablespoons coconut milk, 1 tablespoon flaxseed or hemp oil, 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Top with raisins and serve piping hot.

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Inner Circle Fat Loss:

Fat loss routine that Ben talks about in the mixed interval training training program:

5 minute bike warm-up at 50%

Stationary bike interval training:
30s at 70%
60s at 90%
60s at 70%

Stationary stepper:
30s at 90%
60s at 60%
60s at 60%

Core-strength routine (listen to the podcast for Ben's suggestions on substitutions)

(45 seconds for each):
Swiss ball crunch
Swiss ball side crunch
V-up crunch
Pelvic lifts
Swiss Ball extensions

Stationary bike interval training:
30s at 90%
90s at 60%
30s at 90%

Stationary elliptical:
90s at 80%
30s at 60%
30s at 90%

Core-strength routine (listen to the podcast for Ben's suggestions on substitutions)

(45 seconds for each):
Swiss ball crunch
Swiss ball side crunch
V-up crunch
Pelvic lifts
Swiss Ball extensions

Stationary stepper:
30s at 70%
60s at 90%
60s at 70%

Stationary elliptical:
30s at 90%
60s at 60%
60s at 90%

(45 seconds for each):
Swiss ball crunch
Swiss ball side crunch
V-up crunch
Pelvic lifts
Swiss Ball extensions

Treadmill:
30s at 90%
90s at 60%
30s at 90%

Stationary bicycle:
30s at 70%
60s at 90%
60s at 70%

(45 seconds for each):
Swiss ball crunch
Swiss ball side crunch
V-up crunch
Pelvic lifts
Swiss Ball extensions

If you have questions about any topics or workouts covered in the podcast, PLEASE DON'T E-MAIL THEM. Instead, simply leave your comments below.


Also published on Medium.

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22 thoughts on “Inner Circle Podcast #1 – Are Microwaves Healthy?, Fat Loss Workout Research.

  1. Mark says:

    Hey guys, love the podcast. Just wondering if there's any way to read the studies done on microwaving food that you refer to in the podcast? Thanks

    1. Here's some:

      [1] Davis D R. (February 1, 2009) “Declining fruit and vegetable nutrient composition: What is the evidence?” American Society of Horticultural Science

      [2] Rust S and Kissinger M. (November 15, 2008) “BPA leaches from ‘safe’ products” Journal Sentinel Online

      [3] “Microwave oven radiation,” Food and Drug Administration

      [4] Havas M. “DECT phone affects the heart!”

      [5] Vallejo F, Tomas-Barberan F A, and Garcia-Viguera C. “Phenolic compound contents in edible parts of broccoli inflorescences after domestic cooking” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (15 Oct 2003) 83(14);1511-1516

      [6] Kidmose U and Kaack K. Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica B 1999:49(2):110-117

      [7] Song K and Milner J A. “The influence of heating on the anticancer properties of garlic,” Journal of Nutrition 2001;131(3S):1054S-57S

      [8] Watanabe F, Takenaka S, Abe K, Tamura Y, and Nakano Y. J. Agric. Food Chem. Feb 26 1998;46(4):1433-1436

      [9] George D F, Bilek M M, and McKenzie D R. “Non-thermal effects in the microwave induced unfolding of proteins observed by chaperone binding,” Bioelectromagnetics 2008 May;29(4):324-30

      [10] Quan R (et al) “Effects of microwave radiation on anti-infective factors in human milk,” Pediatrics 89(4 part I):667-669.

      [11] Lee L. “Health effects of microwave radiation-microwave ovens,” Lancet December 9, 1989 (Article)

      [12] Thomas W. “Cooked” Alive.com

      [13] “Microwave oven and microwave cooking overview,” Powerwatch

      [14] “History of microwave ovens” Green Health Watch

      [15] “Microwave ovens: A danger to your health?” (January 26, 2010) Nutritional and Physical Regeneration

      [16] Villablanca E (December 19, 2007) “Ionizing and non-ionizing radiation: Their difference and possible health consequences”

      [17] “Health effects of microwave radiation (Western view)”

      [18] Sage C. “Reported biological effects from radiofrequency non-ionizing radiation” Wave-Guide.org

      [19] Penn State University. “DNA and the microwave effect” posted from MailBag (April 8, 2002)

      [20] Kakita Y, Kashige N, Murata K, Kuroiwa A, Funatsu M and Watanabe K. "Inactivation of Lactobacillus bacteriophage PL-1 by microwave irradiation" Microbiol. Immunol. 1995;39:571-576.

      [21] Adams C. (May 6, 2005) “Does microwaving kill nutrients in food? Is microwaving safe?” The Straight Dope

      1. Mark says:

        Thanks a lot, Ben.

  2. J.L says:

    Monica Reinagel on microwave safety and nutrient loss- see: http://www.self.com/fooddiet/blogs/nutritiondata/…

    1. J.L, we talked about much more than just nutrient loss from microwaving vegetables, and even if minimal nutrients are lost, most folks cook the veggies in or covered in plastic, which raises one of the primary concerns we discussed.

  3. Jo-Anne says:

    Happy to say, that I have never owned a microwave at home. I was just about to buy new kitchen appliances and include a above stove microwave w/ fan. Now I'll save that small expense and just purchase the refrig, stove, stove fan and dishwasher. Thanks for the info.

  4. BT20 says:

    Ben – have you ever tried eating your morning oatmeal raw? I take a handful of old fashioned oats, some almonds, berries, cinnamon, protein powder, almond milk, and sometimes a bit of yogurt to thicken it up. Mix it up, let it sit on the counter for a few minutes to thicken up a bit and eat it. You can also mix the oats, almond milk and put in the fridge overnight then add the rest of the ingredients in the morning. I'm not sure if there is any nutritional benefit of cooked vs raw but after eating raw oats, I never want to go back to cooked.

    1. Well, I do like raw oatmeal-raisin cookie dough. It's worth a try! Thanks, BT20.

  5. BT20 says:

    Loved the podcast. I hope you two planning on doing more together.

    I never realized how much I actually used the microwave until I listened to this and became more aware. I just had last night's leftovers and instead of dirtying a pot to heat them up I got a bowl (glass of course) that was slightly larger than the bowl the leftovers were in and put boiling water in it, then set the bowl of leftovers on top (kind of like a double boiler effect. It didn't get it hot but it was warm and no extra dishes to wash.

    I always make homemade soup in the slow cooker and freeze it for lunches at work. I am going to try making my soups thicker now and just add boiling water to it when I get to work to thin it out and get it hotter. I might even try a thermos.

  6. Kai says:

    Any guidance / tips on getting young children to eat healthy? How have to dealt with this with your own kids? My daughter is 2 and her diet is pretty much fruit, noodles of any kind, rice, and tofu. Getting her to eat veggies is impossible.

    1. Jessa says:

      Well with our kids getting greens down them hasn't been to difficult. Their problem has been a texture thing like slimy cooked onions "snakes". I had a girl friend who had the same problem that you are dealing with and she got this cook book "Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids Eating Good" by Jessica Seinfeld. The idea is to hide the good food. I am not totally on board with this because I think to create good eating habits in kids they need to see the good food their eating. But for an immediate fix I might try this. Another thing Ben and I do is, I never cook a different meal for our kids. They always eat what they see us eating. If I think it is going to be to spicy for them I simple portion out the food for my boys before I add the spices. It has worked really well for us. One more thing I always have what I call a "Winner" at the table. This is a dish that I know my kids like. I hope this is some what helpful. Best of luck to you.

  7. 13petals says:

    hi guys, great podcast!! from now on i,ll be taking my morning milk at room temperature. :D cause like i dont wanna have to wash a pan for one cup of milk.

    1. Jessa says:

      I so hear ya on that. I hate dishes!

  8. feerlessfood says:

    This was a really enlightening podcast- thanks for the information! For years I have been preparing frozen broccoli every night by simply pouring the frozen broccoli in a microwave-safe bowl, covering it with Saran wrap, and microwaving it for 6 minutes. I was under the impression that this was the best way to preserve the nutrients, and that other ways of preparation, like boiling it, would lose all the nutrients and benefits.
    So if not the microwave, what would be the healthiest way to prepare frozen vegetables? Steaming them in just a touch of water on the stove? Thanks for any input!

    1. Jessa says:

      Steaming is the best way to cook veggies because it doesn't soak in the water. If you boil food the water leaches a lot of the nutrient out of the food. So when ever you can steam those veggies (one thing I noticed is the veggies are much more vibrant in color to when steamed). You can buy a steaming basket, a full blown steamer or just put a scant of water in a pot and make sure to cover.

      1. feerlessfood says:

        Great- I'll try that, thanks for the response!

  9. Colleen says:

    HI Ben & Jessa. Loved the new podcast. The information on micorwaves was an eye-opener. I'll be replacing my microwave with a toaster oven tomorrow. Thank you for the great information!

  10. Want2RunAgain says:

    What are your thoughts on using a crock pot (or slow cooker)? Does it retain more vitamins and enzymes because the food cooks at a lower temperature?

    1. jessa greenfield says:

      Crock Pots or Slow Cookers are a great way cook. You are absolutly right. More Vitamins are retained due to the low temperature. Most crock pots heat up to 170 degrees and require about 8 – 12 hours of cook time. However never reheat meals in a crock pot. Not only will it take forever it will be a breading ground for bacteria and other things you don't want in your food.

    2. Kelcey says:

      I use my crockpot to cook steel cut or whole oats: take 4 cups liquid (I use 3 cups water and 1 cup almond milk); add 1 cup grains (steel-cut oats, or any other whole grain, or a combination) and put ingredients in the crockpot. Cover, cook overnight (8 hours or more) and it's ready first thing in the morning. You can add any fresh or dried fruits, protein powders, etc. after it has been cooked. I usually add some banana chunks, raisins, cinnamon, etc. Left-overs can be heated in a saucepan on the stove with a small amount of water.

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