Secrets Of The Navy Seals: How To Train, Eat & Think Like The World’s Toughest Fighters

mark divine
Fitness, Podcast

If you read the article “Look, Feel and Perform Like An Ancient Spartan Warrior – How To Become An Absolute Physical Beast“, then you know that in an effort to challenge my body and mind, I’m personally adding some epic events to my 2014 calendar, such as the Spartan Beast, the SEALFIT Academy and the SEALFIT Kokoro Camp.

How about you?

Do you want to know how to train, eat and think like the world’s toughest fighters?

Turn yourself into an absolute physical beast?

Or perhaps just get the mental edge to be tough when it really counts?

Then today’s podcast with Commander Mark Divine (pictured above) is for you. Mark is the mastermind behind SEALFIT. His certifications, experience, and honors include:

-CPA, New York State
-BUD/s class 170 Honor man
-SEAL TEAM 3 Platoon CDR
-Commanding Officer, NR SEAL TEAM 1
-Commander, US Navy Reserves
-Colonel, Kentucky Order of Colonels
-Ambassador, SEAL (NSW) Foundation
-Ashtanga Yoga Instructor training
-Combat Defense Master Trainer
-S.C.A.R.S. Military H2H instructor
-Seido Karate: black belt
-Goju Ryu Karate: black belt
-Saito Ninjutsu: brown belt
-Various CrossFit and Self Defense certifications

Mark is the author of several books, including 8 Weeks to SEALFIT, Way of the SEAL and Unbeatable Mind, and during this show, you’ll discover:

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-Mark’s unique story of how he went from financial accountant to Navy SEAL…

-Some of the craziest things that happen during the SEAL’S infamous “Hell Week”…

-Mark’s top tip to deal with extreme cold and fluctuations in temperature…

-2 potent tricks the Navy SEALs use to deals with sleep deprivation…

-5 components of fitness to make you extremely physically tough…

-A sample workout to see if you’re fit enough to be a Navy SEAL…

-What the SEALs do about overtraining, and how to make sure you don’t overtrain…

Questions, comments or feedback about How To Train, Eat & Think Like The World’s Toughest Fighters? Leave your thoughts below and either myself or Commander Mark Divine will answer!

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11 thoughts on “Secrets Of The Navy Seals: How To Train, Eat & Think Like The World’s Toughest Fighters

  1. Bronson says:

    Comander Divine did not go into detail about the dietary needs necessary for recovery for such workouts. Being a Fat Adapted athlete, how would working out in this manner change your diet?

    1. Here is what Mark had to say:
      I recommend a modified Paleo style fueling plan – 80% paleo, 20% have fun and eat what you like. One key when conducting a hard core functional training program such as SEALFIT is to fuel immediately after the workout with real food that includes a heavy dose of protein. We like Zone quantity (40% protein, 30% carbs, 30% fat) with Paleo quality…and also to shift your fueling habits to eat when you are hungry rather than all in one fell swoop 2-3 times a day. SEALFIT athletes are great snackers and do not gorge at lunch or dinner. Also, consider a protein shake before bed (I actually drink a large glass of milk, which falls in the 20% non-paleo category). Supplement as needed with high quality vitamin mix such as Bionix an omega 3 and a good sleep cocktail such as Sleep Ready.

      Hooyah!
      Mark

  2. Carl says:

    Thank you both for a great discussion – I have listened to this multiple times and have purchased Commander Divine’s books.

    In the discussion, you both started to discuss the big 4 of mental toughness, but the conversation went in another wonderful direction and we only heard 2 of them (deep diaphragmatic breathing and visualization). What are the other 2?

    Carl

  3. marks262 says:

    Thanks Ben that has helped, I will try some of the points out in training.

    I think the 20 minute naps would be best option as I was planning to eat solid food (instead of gels) and kit change based on time of day and weather conditions in England. Which I could add a 20 minute nap to that which would give me some sleep and also allow me time to refocus my mind for the next block of the run.

    Another question for this race I am guessing I will run 60 miles in the 24 hours, based on my 5 1/2 hour marathon at the end of Ironman Lanzarote. I will be doing functional weights, hills and intervals but I was wondering what should the longest run before the race should be?

  4. marks262 says:

    In under 6 months I am doing a 24 hour race where you can do as many 5 mile laps in that time starting at midday. I have done a number of Ironman triathlons taking from 13 to 16 hours, I was wondering is there any tips about sleep deprivation techniques for during training and during the actual race.

    1. Yes, I have 2 resources for you:

      1) previous podcast on Uberman sleep cycles: https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/2010/09/episo

      2) podcast on how to mitigate effects of an all nighter: https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/2012/03/is-an

      Hope that helps!
      Ben

  5. Kiwipaleo says:

    I really enjoyed this podcast – but where do we 'beginners' start? Us nearly 50 guys who have done some training but not so much recently, who have a base knowledge of some training , but are not really conditioned enough even to attempt the warm up Mark described :)

    1. You certainly do need to ease into it! Good call. Starting with something like this book http://www.pacificfit.net/Shape21.html would be a good idea.

  6. Helen_Driscoll says:

    Fabulous interview! What I found especially interesting was the discussion about heart rate variability vs 'state recognition' (for lack of a better term). Since I'm a kinesthetic learner – and intuitive – it was easy for me to 'check in' and learn to adjust my state (with breathing, eye position, visualization, stance). When I try to teach these methods to friends that are digital learners (very mental, sequential thinkers) — I can see that they don't know what I'm asking of them. So a biofeedback device is probably really good for non-kinesthetic learners as they need a method that is "objective" (a machine that reads their biometrics) to train them to cue in to themselves. An advanced black belt that I've learned state management from, has an interesting technique training digital guys how to clue in. Vivid sexual cues. Seems to work every time!

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